May 2017

Seasonal residences burglarized between New Denver and Kaslo

Anyone with information regarding these crimes is asked to contact the Slocan Lake RCMP at (250) 358-2222 or the Kaslo RCMP at (250) 353-2225.

RCMP in Slocan Lake and Kaslo are asking for public assistance after reports that seasonal residences were broken into during the winter.

Const. Herder of the Slocan Lake RCMP said in a media release that thieves stole multiple items from residences located in remote areas between the Villages of New Denver and Kaslo.

Selkirk College Releases 50th Anniversary Commemorative Book

Journeys Taken: Selkirk College - The First 50 Years is now available for purchase.The commemorative coffee table book’s co-authors Takaia Larsen (left) and Bob Hall (right) opened the first boxes hot off the press last week at the Castlegar Campus loading dock.

Five decades in the making, a beautiful coffee table book on the history of inspiring post-secondary education in the West Kootenay and Boundary has been released to help mark Selkirk College’s 50th Anniversary.

Journeys Taken: Selkirk College - The First 50 Yearsstarts at the beginning and chronicles the rich history of post-secondary through words, photographs and brilliant design.

OP/ED: Council Clips by Councillor Sue Heaton-Sherstobitoff

OP/ED: Council Clips by Councillor Sue Heaton-Sherstobitoff

Highlights from tonight's council meeting:

1.) Council approved the 2016 draft financial statements and approved that council hold an Annual Meeting as required under section 99 of the Community Charter on the June 26, 2017 - at the regular council meeting. Part of the draft financial statements show the status of reserves ending 2016. The city has two types of reserves - statutory an operating reserves. Statutory reserves are restricted by community charter and by Bylaw. They can only be used for the purpose specified by Bylaw. Where operating reserves can generally be utilized at the discretion of council. An important consideration however, is that council can only use these reserves for the purpose that they were established - water reserves, sewer reserves, etc. At the end of 2016 there was $4,518,354 in Statutory Reserves and $3,051,627 in Operating Reserves. At the end of December 2016 the city had approximately $793,900 of development reserve and 1.8 million of operating internal financing to pay itself. This amount will be repaid by 2021.

Three explosions force evacuation of local business

Three explosions force evacuation of local business

Employees at KC Recycling in Waneta got a bit of a fright this morning when an electrical fire caused three explosions.

Kootenay Boundary Regional Fire Rescue Captain Grant Tyson said they received the emergency call at 10:18 a.m. and responded with six Trail firefighters and another three from Montrose.

Abbotsford man clocked exceeding 200 km on highway near Castlegar

Warmer weather has seen an increase of speeding drivers on local highways.

The weather has only turned warmer during the past few days but already RCMP have found drivers cranking up the speed on local highways said Sergeant Chad Badry West Kootenay Traffic and Integrated Road Safety Unit in a media release Tuesday.

Badry said with the warmer weather out, police are seeing the speeds increasing, leading to an Abbotsford man having his vehicle impounded for seven days for exceeding the 200-km mark.

Share the roads with motorcycles

Warmer weather promises to bring out the motorcycle riders on roads in the Southern Interior.

ICBC (Insurance Corporation of BC) said sixty per cent of motorcycle crashes in B.C. involve other vehicles.

Which why police and ICBC are urging everyone to share the roads safely with motorcycles and yield the right-of-way at intersections.

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month and, with warmer weather upon us, more riders will be hitting the road. It's important that both drivers and riders practice safe driving to keep our communities safer.

May is Invasive Species Action Month. Nip them in the bud!

burdock

Anyone hiking or biking on trails in our region may have noticed that many of those trails are being hemmed in by certain plants: burdock with its nasty burrs later in the year, spotted knapweed, common tansy, hoary alyssum, policeman's helmet (AKA Himalayan balsam) -- even, in some places, Japanese knotweed -- and other invasive species.  Yes, all those (and many more) are invasives, and they spread especially fast along the trails because we all unwittingly spread their seeds on our clothing, our bikes and our dogs' fur.

Humanity and Progress

Humanity and Progress

Humans. Love us. Hate us. Wonderful. Horrid.

In this column, I am not trying to change anyone’s mind, in contrast to my two-part column of April wherein I was attacking capitalism and hoping to make converts to my opinion. Capitalism is still much on my mind, but I am not going to continue to analyse its effects, merely observe them.

Editorial: One more resource for voting decisions

Editorial:  One more resource for voting decisions

As  most readers here know by now, I'm supremely tired of -- and sickened by -- election communications that tell you terrible (and usually inaccurate) things about the OTHER parties and their candidates, and make wild promises to get your vote.  But I think it's hugely important that people get informed about what the different parties really stand for and what they're most likely to do if elected.  And then vote.  Please vote.

Practical realities of carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems across Canada undermine potential benefits

Canada doesn’t work the way ivory tower economists envision, and instead has become just another tax.

Governments across Canada fail to properly implement carbon-pricing schemes, which could, in theory, both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the economy, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian policy think-tank.