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Regional News

by Timothy Schafer on Monday Sep 26 2011

A lifestyle change was the biggest factor in the arrival of 559 new people to Nelson last year, according to the New Resident Survey released by Community Futures of Central Kootenay.

by Anonymous on Monday Sep 26 2011

Cranbrook will be the first city in B.C. to be allowed to cull its urban deer, the CBC’s Bob Keating reports.

The province will allow the City to deal with its problem deer as they have been attacking pets and even people.

Cranbrook will model its deer cull after what city officials did in Helena, Mont.

by Timothy Schafer on Monday Sep 26 2011

It was standing room only in Nakusp Village council chambers Tuesday, Sept. 13 as the village grappled with a change in the policies and procedures of several Nakusp insurance companies now affecting waterfront residents.

by Nelson Daily Staff on Sunday Sep 25 2011

The Nakusp and Area Community Trails Society is currently heading into tricky waters as they begin application for stewardship of the railbed from Nakusp to Summit Lake. 

by Contributor on Saturday Sep 24 2011

If you spot a fire or smoke south and west of Revelstoke, it is likely due to prescribed pile burning.

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations is planning to burn slash piles created from a fuels management project that took place in spring 2011.

by Contributor on Friday Sep 23 2011

Serious disagreement continues between the BC electric utility companies and thousands of private homeowners who refuse the forced installation of Wireless Smart Meters on their homes without consent. Customers want the Utilities to listen to their valid concerns before pressing ahead with this program.

by Trail Champion staff on Friday Sep 23 2011

A fundraiser exhibition hockey game between the Trail Smoke Eaters and the Thompson Rivers University Wolfpack raised $11,285 for Kolby’s Trust Fund last Saturday.

 

by Ray Grigg on Thursday Sep 22 2011

The puzzle of British Columbia's disappearing Fraser River sockeye is unfolding like a classical murder mystery. Suspects abound.

Suspicion has fallen on such culprits as atypical ocean predators, unusual algae blooms, overfishing, inadequate food supplies, and threatening high temperatures in both marine and river ecologies.

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