Op/Ed

OP/ED: Council Clips by Councillor Sue Heaton-Sherstobitoff

OP/ED: Council Clips by Councillor Sue Heaton-Sherstobitoff

Highlights from tonight's council meeting:

1.) Council approved the 2016 draft financial statements and approved that council hold an Annual Meeting as required under section 99 of the Community Charter on the June 26, 2017 - at the regular council meeting. Part of the draft financial statements show the status of reserves ending 2016. The city has two types of reserves - statutory an operating reserves. Statutory reserves are restricted by community charter and by Bylaw. They can only be used for the purpose specified by Bylaw. Where operating reserves can generally be utilized at the discretion of council. An important consideration however, is that council can only use these reserves for the purpose that they were established - water reserves, sewer reserves, etc. At the end of 2016 there was $4,518,354 in Statutory Reserves and $3,051,627 in Operating Reserves. At the end of December 2016 the city had approximately $793,900 of development reserve and 1.8 million of operating internal financing to pay itself. This amount will be repaid by 2021.

Letter: Voter not happy with choices

Letter: Voter not happy with choices

To The Editor:

When I contemplate the choices we have in  the upcoming provincial election, I must admit I get depressed. I think we need a new category on the voting ballot entitled None of the Above.

The Liberals can be characterized as sneaky taxers with a conceited attitude. They are also given to flip and smart alec sophistry instead of candid, direct answers on issues. They obviously suffer from the corruption of power.

Riches beyond any party's wildest dreams

The B.C. Liberals raised $13.1 million while the  B.C. NDP raised $6.2 million and B.C. Green party came in at $754,988.

Earlier this month the 2016 donation numbers for B.C.'s political parties were filed with Elections B.C. and, not unexpectedly, it was another bumper crop for the B.C. Liberals. 

The party raised $13.1 million, more than any other provincial party in Canada and $4.8 million more than the federal NDP and Green party combined. 

The B.C. NDP raised $6.2 million – $791,469 more than its federal counterpart – and the B.C. Green party came in at $754,988.

Nearly eight in ten Canadians have used alternative medicines: survey

More than three-quarters of Canadians — 79 per cent — have used at least one complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) or therapy sometime in their lives.

More and more Canadians are using complementary and alternative medicines and therapies—such as massage, yoga, acupuncture and chiropractic care—and they’re using them more frequently, finds a new survey by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The incredible shrinking role of government in BC

Today, spending is just 18.4 per cent of BC’s total economic pie (GDP) on government programs and services compared to 21.1 per cent in 2000.

During an election, pundits and political parties tend to focus on spending promises. But the attention on spending makes it easy to forget that we’ve actually witnessed an incredible shrinking of government’s role in BC over the past 15 years.

Unlike the strange mist that shrinks Scott Carey in the 1957 sci-fi classic, The Incredible Shrinking Man, the cause of BC’s shrinking public sector is not so mysterious.

Rossland's Taxes Not High Enough?

Rossland's Taxes Not High Enough?

Dear fellow Rosslanders,

            You may or may not be aware, but it is municipal budget and tax rate setting time again.  There is no really exciting way to start this conversation, but it might be one that you would benefit from taking a moment to look at.

Fracking and all of us: recent news

gas flare

To further our understanding of what's accelerating climate change, here's a brand-new report from the David Suzuki Foundation about leaking of methane from fracking and other fossil fuel extraction being much greater than reported by industry and government, and how it has been measured, and why it's scary:

Methane emissions much higher than reported, threaten climate and GHG reduction targets

Compare the candidates and their parties: Part II

Green Party Candidate Samantha Troy

The Rossland Telegraph asked two sets of questions of the local candidates in this provincial election.  Answers to the first four questions (Part I) appeared last week. Candidates' answers appear in the order in which they were received, and their pictures do too -- last week, we illustrated Part I with Katrine Conroy's picture; this week, we show Samantha Troy's picture; and next week readers will see a picture of Jim Postnikoff.

LETTER: 'My Green vote: weary, hopeful, and defiant'

LettersEd

To The Editor:

It happens every election.  The NDP line up and lecture other lefties on how they mustn’t split the vote and open an avenue for the current government to retain power.

It’s always the same.  Defeating the political right is of paramount importance, they sternly warn, and a vote for the Greens is a vote for the right.

Candidates Answer Four Questions (or not): Part I

NDP Candidate Katrine Conroy. Other candidates' pictures will appear in the next two parts.

Last week, I posted an editorial criticizing negative campaigning, and posed questions for our local candidates to answer -- without mentioning other candidates or other parties. Here are two of our local candidates' answers to the first set of four questions; the third candidate, Liberal Jim Postnikoff, was unfortunately unable to respond in time. Where possible, I have looked through the Liberal platform and attempted to find the Liberal approach on the topics of the questions, and inserted what I could find.

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