Op/Ed

COLUMN: Oceans and Life

Photo by Tavish Campbell

The federal government recently created two marine protected areas in the Pacific region and has committed to increase ocean protection from one per cent to 10 by 2020. But will this be enough?

Canada has the longest coastline of any nation, but our country doesn’t end at its ocean shores. With a 200-nautical-mile economic zone and international obligations, Canada is responsible for almost three million square kilometres of ocean, an area roughly the size of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba combined.

Caribou, Logging, Wolves and Corporate Donors

Photo by David Moskowitz for DeSmog Canada

What poses the greatest hazard to BC's endangered Southern Mountain Caribou -- habitat loss, wolves, or corporate donors?  Or are all three of those factors linked, and if so, how? This opinion piece is from DeSmog Canada.  Read and contemplate.

Katrine Conroy campaign office kickoff signals start of 2017 Provincial Election in Kootenay West

Conroy welcoming longtime supporters, Bonnie and Norm Essery to the 2017 Campaign Office.

While it still may not look very much like it in some corners, winter is releasing its grip on the West Kootenay. Snowfalls turning to rain showers, songbirds returning to the trees, and creeks swollen with runoff signal the return of spring to the region. And, along with the seasonal turns, every four years also brings with it spring provincial elections. In the provincial riding of Kootenay West that means NDP candidate, Katrine Conroy, is gearing up her campaign to, once again, win the honour of representing the riding in the Provincial Legislature of British Columbia.

COLUMN: From the Hill -- Why RCMP Morale is Declining

COLUMN: From the Hill -- Why RCMP Morale is Declining

Over the past month I have visited most of the RCMP detachments in South Okanagan-West Kootenay.  While the conversations covered some of the obvious law and order issues such as marijuana legalization, rising levels of property crime and staffing levels for highway patrol, I was surprised that one issue dominated most of my visits—declining morale in the force.

Western Union transfers happily accepted by B.C.'s political parties

And the list goes on.

B.C. politics already has its dark money – donations that are difficult to trace back to an actual donor – but the free for all when it comes to political fundraising in the province has given rise to a murky practice: raising campaign cash from some dark corners of the world.

Its name seems innocuous enough, G&E Studio.

It's just one of the companies identified among the 76,887 donations that the B.C. Liberal party received between 2005 and 2015.

COLUMN: Amazing Advances in Technology

One smartphone has more computing power than NASA used to put men on the moon in 1969.

If you own a smartphone, you have more computing power at your fingertips than NASA scientists had when they put people on the moon in 1969! And it’s in a small device, unlike the massive hardware the space agency used.

COLUMN: From the Hill -- 2017 Budget Comments

Member of Parliament Richard Cannings

As I discussed in my last column, the federal government had an opportunity in last week’s budget to finally start closing the growing income inequality gap in Canada. But, unfortunately the Liberals chose tax breaks for wealthy Canadians and giveaways to large corporations over helping the unemployed, veterans, and Indigenous children.

Letter: More funding not always the answer

Letter: More funding not always the answer

To The Editor:

More funding might help our seniors if they are in a publicly owned facility. A few more staff and maybe an extra therapist. But history shows that more funding has not improved the quality of care in "for profit" or even "non-profit" facilities.

The taxpayers shelled out more money in 2010 when the client rate was increased which according to the Health Minister, was to be used to increase staff levels.

Did that happen? No.

Wanted: more walk, less talk in today’s federal budget

Missed opportunity says Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

The federal government missed a key opportunity to walk the walk and tackle income inequality in today’s federal budget, says Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Senior Economist David Macdonald.

“While there are some positive aspects to Budget 2017,” Macdonald says, “let’s not mistake this for the bold, visionary inequality reduction budget that Canadians were promised by this government.”

Open Letter from Anglican Church to Senator Lynn Beyak

Open Letter from Anglican Church to Senator Lynn Beyak

Senator Lynn Beyak's complaint that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) "didn't focus on the good" done by Canada's residential schools has provoked calls for her resignation, and some people wonder how she is qualified to sit on the Senate's Aboriginal Peoples Committee.

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