Health

EDITORIAL: My insidious wardrobe

synthetic fleece, and nore fleece -- fleece is everywhere, even in the fish we eat

What next?  It seems that everything we do is an environmental problem.  Triclosan in "anti-bacterial" soaps and toothpastes and so on just contributed to developing antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and was bad for people who used the products, too.  Microbeads in toothpaste and various cosmetics built up astonishing levels of micro-bead plastic pollution in waterways, oceans and marine life, including our food.  Fossil fuels that get us and our products around so effortlessly are disrupting our climate, apparently uncontrollably.  Other oil industry products such as plastic nets, bags and other trash, and fertilizers used to excess, are building up in the oceans and fresh-water sources with deadly results.  NOW what?

​ICBC and BC Transplant expand organ donation program across the province

Global BC reporter Aaron McArthur and wife Elaine Yong hold daughter Addison who was the first baby to receive a heart transplant at BC Children’s Hospital. — Submitted photo

Starting Monday, every British Columbian visiting an ICBC driver licensing location will be asked to register their decision about organ donation.

To increase the number of people with a registered decision, ICBC and BC Transplant are expanding a provincial partnership to all ICBC driver licensing locations across the province.

More potentially deadly chemicals being found in street-level drugs in BC

More potentially deadly chemicals being found in street-level drugs in BC

BC RCMP wishes to advise that recent Health Canada tests have confirmed the presence of the compound W-18 and a fentanyl analog recently in two communities, and that drug users should be aware these chemicals may be present anywhere.

In mid-December, 2016, Surrey RCMP seized pebble heroin, among other drugs, in relation to a dial-a-dope drug investigation. Health Canada has just confirmed the presence of W-18 within the heroin sample.

Bats flying in the winter? Or, find a dead bat? Please report. Here's why.

Bat with White Nose Syndrome.  Photo by Marvin Moriarty.

Bats are an essential part of the global ecosystem. They save agriculture a great deal of money by eating vast numbers of crop-destroying insects such as Colorado Potato Beetles, and they save humans a lot of itching by eating vast numbers of flying, biting insects such as mosquitoes. For years, bats had an undeserved bad reputation, but gradually we are learning to understand their huge value.

Column: Understanding Climate Change Means Reading Beyond the Headlines

moose with winter ticks

Seeing terms like “post-truth” and “alternative facts” gain traction in the news convinces me that politicians, media workers and readers could benefit from a refresher course in how science helps us understand the world. Reporting on science is difficult at the best of times. Trying to communicate complex ideas and distil entire studies into eye-catching headlines and brief stories can open the door to misinformation and limited understanding.

Representative for Children and Youth: Alex's Story Prompts Acting Rep to Recommend Key Changes

Bernard Richard, BC's Acting Representative for Children and Youth

Lacking any permanent connection to his family and culture and without the mental health supports that might have made a difference, an 18-year-old Métis youth in care took his own life in an act of desperation, says an investigative report issued today by British Columbia’s Acting Representative for Children and Youth.

Lab test confirms carfentanil is being ingested

Carfentanil is a drug is similar to fentanyl but can be 100 times more toxic – one or two grains the size of salt grains can be fatal.

As part of the surveillance related to the opioid overdose public health emergency, the province has confirmed through laboratory testing that carfentanil is present in the illegal drug supply in the Lower Mainland and being ingested.

In a media release Wednesday, the province said urine lab testing found carfentanil present in 57 of 1766 urine drug tests conducted from Jan. 10-24, 2017.

A solo skier with a sprained knee; Rossland SAR to the rescue

It's cold out there.  Where's a cabin when you need one? Not too far away, fortunately.

The Rossland Range Recreation Site's day-use shelters are mostly used by hikers, bikers, skiers and snowshoers to warm up in while they toast their cheese sandwiches on a stove.  But on January 31, the new Sunspot Cabin also provided warmth and shelter for an injured skier while she waited for help to arrive.

Editorial: Medical Assistance in Dying

Editorial:  Medical Assistance in Dying

The Rossland Telegraph interviewed a local doctor  (let's call this person "Dr. X") to learn what people in our area suffering from "grievous and irremediable" conditions that result in enduring and intolerable suffering can expect if they conclude that they want to have medical assistance in dying (MAID). 

Paramedics: an essential service, or just healthcare workers?

A heart attack victim receiving expert care

There you are, flat on the floor with crushing chest pain.  "Heart attack!" you think, while the world goes a bit grey and fuzzy.  But you're able to reach your phone and dial 911.  Is this an emergency?  Are the paramedics who come to tend  you essential, or just nice to have, like a clean floor to lie on while you wait for help to arrive?

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