Health

Kratom Products Recalled: Serious Health Risks

The plant, Mitragyna Speciosa.  Photo by Uomo Vitruviano

Health Canada has announced that a company, Garnoff Botanicals, is voluntarily recalling unauthorized kratom products as they may pose serious health risks.

Haven't heard of kratom?  Don't feel bad -- you're not alone.  Kratom is the plant pictured above, or products derived from it.  What health risks does it pose?  Health Canada did  not specify the risks of the particular products being recalled in its announcement, but a Google search uncovers several known risks of kratom:

Bat encounters can put you at risk for rabies — Interior Health

In 2016, 61 people in the Interior Health region were treated for potential exposure to rabies.

Interior Health is advising the public of the importance of avoiding physical contact with bats, the primary carrier of the rabies virus in B.C.
 
IH said rabies is a very serious disease that affects the nervous system and is almost always fatal if not treated in time.

In 2016, 61 people in the Interior Health region were treated for potential exposure to rabies.

OPINION: On cancelling funding for Planned Parenthood and other organizations providing a wide range of health services

OPINION: On cancelling funding for Planned Parenthood and other organizations providing a wide range of health services

Children are beautiful.  They embody our hopes for the future. Does that mean that girls and women should be forbidden access to sex education and family planning?  

Following the Women's March on Washington and supporting marches in thousands of centres internationally, women's rights and their health and well-being globally took a severe blow.

COLUMN: Work less, live better, do better

A worker who could benefit from working fewer hours

In 1926, U.S. automaker Henry Ford reduced his employees’ workweek from six eight-hour days to five, with no pay cuts. It’s something workers and labour unions had been calling for, and it followed previous reductions in work schedules that had been as high as 84 to 100 hours over seven days a week.

Nearly eight in ten Canadians have used alternative medicines: survey

More than three-quarters of Canadians — 79 per cent — have used at least one complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) or therapy sometime in their lives.

More and more Canadians are using complementary and alternative medicines and therapies—such as massage, yoga, acupuncture and chiropractic care—and they’re using them more frequently, finds a new survey by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Fracking and all of us: recent news

gas flare

To further our understanding of what's accelerating climate change, here's a brand-new report from the David Suzuki Foundation about leaking of methane from fracking and other fossil fuel extraction being much greater than reported by industry and government, and how it has been measured, and why it's scary:

Methane emissions much higher than reported, threaten climate and GHG reduction targets

Illicit drug death numbers continue to rise

Provisional data shows that a total of 120 persons died as a result of illicit drug use during the month of March. — Submitted photo

The number of illicit drug deaths in March remained high, with the third-highest number ever for a single month said the BC Coroners Service in a media release.

BC Coroners Service said provisional data shows that a total of 120 persons died as a result of illicit drug use during the month of March, an average of almost four deaths (3.9) per day for the month. In contrast, there were 79 illicit drug-related deaths in March 2016.

BC quietly grants Mount Polley permit to pipe mine waste directly into Quesnel Lake

BC quietly grants Mount Polley permit to pipe mine waste directly into Quesnel Lake

This article is from DeSmog Canada, written by Carol Linnit.

The B.C. Ministry of Environment has quietly granted the Mount Polley Mining Corporation permission to drain mining waste directly into Quesnel Lake, B.C.’s deepest fjord lake and a source of drinking water for residents of Likely, B.C., as part of a “long-term water management plan.”

Interior Health announces some Kootenay Boundary radiology results under review

Interior Health announces some Kootenay Boundary radiology results under review

Interior Health issued a media release Tuesday that the authority is initiating a review of diagnostic imaging reports from a radiologist who worked as a locum in the Kootenay Boundary area.

The review is for diagnostic imaging reports during the time periods:

Private well users encouraged to protect drinking water

Better safe than sorry says Interior Health.

With the annual spring melt underway, Interior Health is advising all homeowners with private wells to take appropriate steps to safeguard their drinking water.
 
When spring runoff flows into a well and mixes with the source water, there is significant risk of bacterial contamination.
 
Homeowners should:

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