General

Castlegar, Slocan and Nelson awarded multi-million-dollar grants for infrastructure projects

The stretch of Columbia earmarked for revitalization, as shown by Google Maps.

Castlegar’s Columbia Avenue Complete Streets program got a major boost over the weekend, when two higher levels of government announced more than $3 million in grant funding toward the project.

The federal and provincial governments have committed $1, 607,421 each to the project, with the City of Castlegar paying the remaining $1,607,422.

Teck Trail Operations Completes Construction of Groundwater Treatment Plant

Teck Trail Operations Completes Construction of Groundwater Treatment Plant

Teck Trail Operations has completed construction of the Groundwater Treatment Plant, a $46-million investment to address groundwater affected by the site’s historical activities. Commissioning of the plant is currently under way, and the plant is expected to be fully operational by summer 2017.

“The Groundwater Treatment Plant demonstrates our commitment to addressing effects of our historical operations and aligns with our ongoing focus to ensure the environment is protected,” said Thompson Hickey, General Manager, Teck Trail Operations.

Castlegar cadet receives long service medal

Squadron Commander Gerry Rempel presents Flight Sgt. Alec Pistak with medal.

Recently Flight Sergeant Alec Pistak of 581 City of Castlegar Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron received his Long Service Medal.

The Long Service Medal is awarded by the Air Cadet League of Canada to Air Cadets who have completed four years of service with the Air Cadet Program.

Castlegar Students Step Out Into The Wonder Of Winter

Students at Robson Community learn about animal tracks.

This winter, over 3,000 elementary students throughout the Columbia Basin stepped out of their classrooms and into the magical world of Winter Wonder.

In the Castlegar area, Winter Wonder educators Alyssa Belanger, Genna Lazier and Mary Searchfield took twenty Kindergarten to Grade 3 classes from Kinnaird Elementary, Fruitvale Elementary, Robson Community and Castlegar Primary on half-day field studies to discover the awe of winter and why it is so important for our local ecosystems. Judging by the rosy-cheeked smiles on everybody’s faces, amazing days out were had by all.

COLUMN: Shine Your Light

COLUMN:  Shine Your Light

Scissors and Paste

The academic supervisor for my post-grad thesis in history would not have approved of what I do in this edition of the Arc. He dismissed the method (with a curl of his lip) thus: “writing with scissors and paste, Charles.”

I have looked over several pieces of writing recently, some of it my own, and I am making a scrapbook of topics that hang together. The theme emerges from the topics.

Avalanche Canada issues 'High' risk in backcountry

Avalanche Canada is asking the public to be extremely careful.

Avalanche Canada is asking the public to be extremely careful when venturing into the backcountry over the next few days as recent high elevation rain has created very dangerous avalanche conditions.

"Very large natural avalanches are expected on Wednesday," said the Avalanche Canada website warning.

"Now is an appropriate time to avoid all avalanche terrain including the run out zones of large avalanches paths."

Film Screening in Rossland: A New Economy

From the documentary film "A New Economy"

 A recent documentary film, " A New Economy," explores what might happen if working together for the common good were to become the most common business model.

Can the world be saved?  Can co-operation save us? Or can global capitalism, with its dependence on the infinite exponential economic growth demanded by return on investment, continue unabated without exhausting the resources that support our economy and ending our civilization? The answer to the latter question is arguably "no."  The answer to the first question -- can co-operation save us -- may well be yes, if we can achieve a paradigm shift in values, this film suggests.

Recovery of our most endangered plants and animals is possible

Dan Kraus is Weston Conservation Scientist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

I lost my Cracker Jack wildlife cards sometime in the 1980s, but the images printed on the cards are still vivid in my mind. The small cards came wrapped in clear plastic and featured a holographic image of a wildlife species in danger.

I can still see the pencil marks in the top drawer of my old desk where I marked lines to keep them organized. There was a special area in my drawer reserved for the handful of species that lived in my country, and were at risk of extinction.

Snowmaggedon baby recovering in hospital

Baby Elizabeth is pictured doing just fine with mom Ashley, dad  Matt, brother Finn, and sister Emma. — Submitted photo

A Nelson family is praising the staff at Kootenay Lake Hospital and Interior Health for saving the life of their premature baby, who had to be medevaced to Kelowna in the middle of February’s biggest snowstorm.

Officials with Interior Health say it was one of the most complicated medical transfers they’ve ever had to do- one that involved doctors and nurses from Nelson, Trail, Grand Forks and Kelowna, the provincial ambulance service, and even snowplough operators along Highway 3.

City looks to abolish daylight savings time and unregulated micro transmitters

The changing to Pacific Daylight Savings Time each spring has a negative impact on people’s health and cognitive awareness. — Screen shot photo

Daylight Savings Time and micro cell phone towers drew the attention and ire of city council as it considered resolutions to bring to the provincial table for approval.

Each year the Association of Kootenay and Boundary Local Governments (AKBLG) allows its member municipalities the opportunity to put forward resolutions that address issues of a broader spectrum for the Kootenay-Boundary region for the membership’s consideration.

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